Thursday, March 15, 2018

Jūrmala, Latvia, mulls free public transportation for locals

LSM.LV : "Locals would have to acquire a resident's card, similar to those already available in Rīga, to enjoy free rides. The scheme, which would cost Jūrmala around €600,000 a year, would make Jūrmala the second municipality to make public transportation free for its residents, after Rēzekne in Latvia's east.

The scheme operational in Rēzekne, however, provides free rides for people who earn less than 90% of the average national monthly wage. 

"The number of passengers has increased 40 to 50%.. Pupils and students have started to use this opportunity quite actively," says Rēzekne mayor Andrejs Rešetņikovs (Harmony). The scheme costs €320,000 to €340,000 for the city. "

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

German Cities To Trial Ambitious Free Public Transport Plans

HuffPost : "The university city of Tübingen, in southwest Germany, is testing free public transportation for all residents. Two weeks ago, the city began a two-year pilot project using its own funds to provide free rides on Saturdays.

For seven years, local authorities have been trying to provide unlimited public transport, free at the point of access, for a flat 15-euro monthly tax for all residents, Mayor Boris Palmer explained. To do so would require a change in law."

Thursday, March 8, 2018

The Case for Free Public Transport

Global Research : "Nine Points Arguing the Case for Free Public Transport

  • Free fares would be the biggest single pro-environment policy enacted by any national government anywhere on the planet, dramatically slashing car use and CO2 emissions.
  • Free fares would be the biggest anti-poverty, pro-social inclusion policy enacted in Scotland, or anywhere else in the UK. It is mainly people on low incomes who rely on public transport
  • Free fares would cut the number of road accidents, reducing human suffering and relieving pressure on the NHS and the emergency services. The Scottish Executive estimates that road accidents cost £1.4-billion a year to the Scottish economy. (On an average day in Scotland there is one fatal road accident; another 8-10 involving serious injury; and 250-300 minor accidents. The vast majority involve cars.)
  • Free fares would be help to reduce the levels of asthma and other respiratory illnesses, which have risen steeply in line with the expansion of road traffic
  • Free fares would potentially increase the spending power of over a million workers by between £40 and £100 a month, boosting the overall economy.
  • Free fares would increase business efficiency and productivity: the CBI estimates that traffic congestion costs business across Britain between £15 and £20-billion a year.
  • Free fares would be a major tourist attraction, bringing hundreds of millions of pounds into the Scottish economy every year from increased visitor numbers. An increase in tourism of just 20 per cent would bring an extra £1-billion into the Scottish economy.
  • Free fares would attract worldwide support, especially from the global environmental movement, and would bring pressure to bear on governments throughout Europe and the wider world to adopt a similar policy.
  • Free fares would reduce Scotland’s reliance on depleting oil reserves; 67 per cent of all oil produced globally is used for transport."

Monday, February 26, 2018

Brussels air pollution to trigger free public transport : "Brussels’ regional government has approved emergency rules that will allow commuters to use public transport free of charge during periods of high air pollution, Belgian media reported on Friday (23 February).

When particulate matter reaches certain levels in Brussels, travel will be free on STIB services in Brussels and the city’s bike-sharing Villo scheme for a fixed duration of time."

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Nem mais um cêntimo para os transportes públicos "Termino com o mais importante argumento em favor de uma mobilidade tendencialmente gratuita: democratizar a cidade e alargar a qualidade de vida. Se a mobilidade não for um custo, todos os cidadãos poderão viver a cidade e os seus equipamentos em circunstâncias de igualdade. Se matarmos o custo de deslocações das escolas para as bibliotecas, dos lares para os museus, dos bairros para os campos desportivos, estamos a promover a inclusão, a igualdade de oportunidades e uma democracia mais madura.  "

Monday, February 19, 2018

Again the big lie. #freepublictransport will reduce walking.

Can free public transport really reduce pollution? | Environment| All topics from climate change to conservation | DW | 14.02.2018: "If you can take public transport for free you may substitute the short trip you used to walk for public transport. Most of the increase in public transport ridership stems from either people who walked previously, or previous transport users who travel more frequently or perform longer trips. Only a small part of those additional trips come from people who also used the car. So we cannot say that there was a net gain in terms of reducing car traffic, or the congestion and emissions associated with it."
This lie is their best one apparently. They keep using it. Where is the data? There are plenty of studies that show that public transport leads to more active transport. 

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Germany considers making public transport free to fight air pollution

The Local : "The German government is considering several measures for improving the quality of air in major cities, including making all inner city public transport free to use."